10 Hilarious Examples Of False Advertising

Description:
When you have to sell a product, you will take whatever measures needed to make sure that advertising is memorable and makes sales. If your product is mediocre, then you really have to do what you can to ensure that people will buy your product. If you can’t sell the product using television ads or put in any more money to make sure that your product is of the highest quality, then you need to do what you can to sell it. Yes, it may end up making many people mad, and could end up in some returns, but you’ll count on the fact that most people don’t want to bother with the hassle.
What is described here is the trend of false advertising. False advertising can range from “bait and switch” to completely lying about what product is inside the package. While it is extremely risky to conduct business in that matter, there is sure to be trouble and public humiliation on the internet. When the customer sees what’s on the box, they expect to receive the product that’s on the box. The same goes for dating profiles, when a suitor is trying to find a date, and they will portray themselves in a certain light so that they are more appealing. In this video are ten hilarious examples of false advertising. Whether it is receiving a completely different product, or the ad portrays something too big but it’s really too small, these advertisements don’t portray the real deal.
Companies will do whatever it takes to land a sale, even if it means stretching the truth about the quality of their product. From toys arriving too small to getting a completely different product, here are 10 hilarious examples of false advertising.

 

Why American ad agencies are being accused of having secret agendas

Image: Getty / Robert Machado Noa

American ad agencies routinely use hidden business arrangements to boost profits without their clients’ knowledge, according to an explosive new report from the Association of National Advertisers.

The report says that these undisclosed dealings, such as rebates awarded by media companies based on how much agencies spend or pressure to do business with agencies linked to a parent company, are “pervasive” across the U.S. media-buying industry.

For the brands buying the advertising, the concern is that these secret incentives might cause agencies to spend their money in a way that puts the agency’s own best interests before that of their clients.

That’s whythe ANA, a marketing trade group that represents big global brands like Coca-Cola, Procter & Gamble, General Motors and AT&T, has an interest in uncovering these practices.

A research firm called K2 Intelligence prepared the report on the group’s behalf based on interviews with 150 anonymous sources. Of the 117 of those sources with a direct role in the media buying process, 59 said they had been involved in undisclosed dealings of this sort in at least one instance.

The highly-anticipated release stirred up plenty of debate across the industry on Tuesday. Though the report avoided naming any individual agencies or cases for the sake of protecting anonymous sources, several agencies and their holding companies lashed out at its findings in statements.

“A healthy and constructive debate about media buying can only happen with a bipartisan, engaged, industry-wide approach and that is precisely the opposite of what the ANA has pursued,” a spokesperson for the American Association of Advertising Agencies said in a statement that captured the sentiment among many of the agencies responding.

We call upon the ANA in the strongest terms to make available to specific agencies on a confidential basis all of the materials related to them,” the statement continued.

At the very least, brand marketers are likely to come away from the report with some questions for the agencies that spend money on their behalf. Agencies will in turn have to reassure them that they are not doing anything unethical.

But there could also be serious consequences; in the past, ad execs have even served jail time for anti-competitive practicesand overcharging clients.

How rebate schemes work

When brand marketers at corporations like McDonald’s or Ford want to buy a television commercial, magazine spread, billboard, online banner or any other type of ad, they usually turn to an agency or an agency division that specializes in buying media space.

As part of this transaction, they expect these agencies to buy whatever slots are needed to meet their demands at the best possible price for the client. They also expect agencies to be transparent about how they go about it.

According to the report, however, many of the media suppliers selling the advertising space regularly offer to pay the buyers rebates of anywhere between 1.7% to around 20% of their spending if they agree to take a certain amount of their total business to them.

Sometimes these rebates are paid in cash or free ad space; other times in the form of cheaper rates for services like consulting or research. But the report found that these services were oftentimes “of minimal utility, significantly overpriced or not provided at all.”

Media buying agencies generally work on behalf of a roster of different brands. So when one buyer gives preferential treatment to any one supplier, there’s a chance it could serve its own bottom line which is rooted in the aggregate interests of all of its clients but not necessarily that of any of its individual clients.

This chart shows how the savings from a 10% rebate might not benefit all an agency’s clients equally. In this case, the agency’s incentives are skewed.

Image: k2 intelligence

Advertising rebates and other such bonuses are common practice in Europe and much of the rest of the world, according to various surveys, but U.S. ad execs have claimed for years that they aren’t used here.

An industry of empires

The advertising industry has consolidated at an accelerating pace in recent years to better compete with deep-pocketed tech giants like Facebook and Google.

As a result, the industry is currently dominated by six big holding companies: WPP, Omnicom, Publicis Groupe, Interpublic, Dentsu and Havas. Together, they control nearly half of the world’s $6 billion ad market.

Each of those companies owns dozens of agencies that operate at every conceivable level of the advertising supply chain. Those resources allow them make the case to shareholders and clients that they can meet all of a brand’s advertising needs within the same company.

But the probe also pointed to some conflicts of interests that come with having so many tentacles.

For instance, the report alleges, some holding companies will buy media at one rate, hike the price by anywhere between approximately 30% and 90%, then resell it to clients through another agency without ever disclosing the original cost. Essentially, they act as their own suppliers.

The flow of money if holding companies use hidden markups to sell media space at inflated prices.

Image: K2 Intelligence

Media buyers are also reportedly pressured or incentivized to buy through these in-house channels, even if doing so is not in the client’s best interest. In other instances, agencies might have an undisclosed stake or an advisory role at a media supplier.

These hidden business practices aren’t just limited to big holding companies though; evidence of such dealings was also found at small independent agencies and across all types of media.

Fierce reactions

As noted above, ad agencies have responded to these findings with anger, arguing that accusations should have been made on an individual basis or as a collaborative effort as to not condemn the entire industry.

“We believe that the key findings neither quantified nor qualified, and based on a small sampling of unnamed sources do not accurately portray how Omnicom’s agencies work on behalf of our clients,” an Omnicom spokesperson said in a pre-emptive statement. “In so doing, it does not serve the best interests of the clients that the ANA purports to represent.”

Accusations of corruption in the advertising industry aren’t entirely new, and some have argued that they are becoming a problem in attracting talent.

Marco Bertozzi, global chief revenue officer at Performics and formerly of Publicis’ Starcom MediaVest Group, wrote in a blog postpublished days before the report was released that “blanket accusations” make it hard for the “kids who are working their socks off” and tarnish the industry’s image when it’s already struggling to lure new workers.

Pivotal Research analyst Brian Wieser factored in early reports of the ANA probe to his somewhat muted growth forecast for the holding company stocks earlier this year.

Brand marketers, meanwhile have been predictably more receptive to the investigation’s findings.

P&G said it relies on regular audits to root out any transparency failings on the part of its agency relationships.

“We have a ‘trust but verify’ approach that includes having clear and thorough stipulations in our contracts, regular audits on performance, and third party verification that ensures transparency,” a company spokesperson said in a statement. “If we find irregularities, we will take remedial action.”

Most reactions in the corporate marketing world seemed to focus on assessing the findings in terms of their own business relationships.

“Trust and transparency are critical to any relationship, so we take the ANAs findings very seriously,” a Unilever spokesperson said in a statemtent. “At Unilever, we are actively engaged with our agencies and the industry at large to exert greater control and responsibility around media transparency.”

The full impact may not be felt until the investigation’s findings have more time to reverberate the industry.

Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2016/06/08/ad-agencies-report-rebates-scheme/

7 apps to help your business grow on Facebook

Image: Ellagrin/getty images

With over1.6 billion monthly active users, there is no doubt that Facebook is the place to be when it comes to looking for platforms to scale your growing business. But how can you leverage this dominant social media channel to make the most of your impressive business efforts?

Heres a list of seven apps that your company should consider if Facebook is a part of your growth strategy.

1. Yotpo

Image: yotpo

While Facebook has been known to be a brands go-to marketing channel, oftentimes your actual customers can generate enough hype around a product to drive sales. Indeed, leveraging user-generated content (UGC) such as customer reviews or user-uploaded images on Facebook can help your business immensely.

With Yotpos Dynamic Ads feature you can use tools to share customer reviews and photos organically, as well as incorporate them into paid adsa tool so valuable, Facebook used it as a casestudy.

2. ViralStyle

Facebook dwarfs all other social channels when it comes to active users, content sharing and referred click-throughs to websites. But the average Facebook users dont spend their time looking for business opportunitiestheyre there to see amusing content and keep upwith friends and loved ones. To effectively take advantage of Facebooks immense marketing potential for business, therefore, companies need to keep their messaging light and fun.

ViralStyle provides a solution for fan community monetization that takes the friction out of selling branded merchandise. This social ecommerce platform lets you offer t- shirts, hoodies, iPhone cases and other products with your own art, and because its all printed and shipped to order, theres zero hassle for inventory or fulfillment.

Using ViralStyles marketing tools, its easy to set up a campaign, which adds a ticker to product pages for a sense of purchase urgency. The platform also integrates with Facebook ads (soon with Shopify as well), to allow users to seamlessly promote creations to highly relevant and targeted buyers.

3. Desk

Image: Desk.com

Today, business owners and marketers are expected to always be reachable and ready to address customer inquiries. While this may seem overwhelming, there are great tools that help facilitate better and more frequent communication between prospective buyers and sellers.

For instance, Desk.com integrates with Facebook as a highly-effective engagement feature that will help address immediate customer questions and concerns. I personally use them for my payments support and it’s helped us manage our thousands of customer tickets each month, a large portion of which comes through Facebook.

4. GetResponse

With so many different marketing options on Facebook, sometimes it is difficult to get the most out of your campaigns. Thankfully, there are solutions such as GetResponses Facebook Web Form App that embeds sign-up forms on your Facebook company page. This allows prospective leads and/or interested page visitors to easily sign up for more information.

5. Cyfe

For businesses, being able to stay ahead of all the marketing tasks can be daunting, especially when data plays a major role in your scaling efforts (as it should). Visuals can help make sense of this mess.

Cyfes business dashboard, for example, displays various metrics that are often indicative of successful or poor marketing campaigns. With this information at hand, marketers can look to scale based on specific benchmarks.

More specifically, you can track your entire social media and Facebook data, to instantly assess your overall campaign performance, cost, CTR, impressions and more.

6. Shopial

Image: facebook

For ecommerce businesses, Facebook is often considered a second priority to your company’s online store. Being in the payments space, I’ve found that most business owners don’t even consider Facebook for ecommerce. Having just discussed the dominance of Facebook usage, you may need to reevaluate your relationship with this outlet.

The Shopial app is a timely one for ecommerce, as it essentially acts as a bridge between the store’s website and Facebook store, allowing you to easily add and advertise specific products to boost engagement and eventual conversion levels.

7. Leadfeeder

On Facebook, B2C engagement outshines B2B prospecting, but savvy business leaders know how to use the ubiquity of Facebook to their advantage. In the B2B space, the journey from curious website visitor to converted customer is complex and rarely predictable. As buyers transition from sales-driven product education to self-service content discovery and become more guarded with their contact details, it isnt always possible to capture email addresses and use prospects inboxes as hubs for lead nurture messaging.

Todays B2B marketers therefore employ a litany of tactics to track prospects across devices and marketing channels, engaging with potentially interested parties wherever possible. With Leadfeeder, you can circumvent the need for lead capture and instead see a dynamic list of anonymous visitors to your website, along with intelligence on the companies they work for and logs of pages they click on. Now here’s where it gets interesting. Because the system integrates with your customer relationship management (CRM) and you can use it to export segmented lists of contacts, the B2B growth hackers out there can easily use Leadfeeder as en engine for creating hyper-targeted Custom Audience ads on Facebook.

Do you have suggestions for other apps that help grow your business on Facebook? Share them in the comments below.

John Rampton

John Rampton is an entrepreneur, investor, online marketing guru, and startup enthusiast. He is the founder of online payment company Due. John is best known as an entrepreneur …More

Read more: http://mashable.com/2016/05/21/7-apps-grow-business-on-facebook/

Nope, the TV Business Isnt Dead Yet. Far From It, Really

Over the past few years, media analysts have bemoaned the Endof TV. Some have wondered, as ratings tumble year after year, why would advertisers continue to buy ads? Meanwhile, Facebook and Googles ad businesses have exploded, even though marketers arent spending drastically more than they have in the past. But the traditional TV industry is not dead just yet.

This month, CBS, 21st Century Fox, and Time Warnerall reported advertising revenue growth. CNN and Fox acknowledgedthey’veseen higher ratings(and ad revenue) thanks in part to the election. And, sure, CBS had the Super Bowl this year. Even so, the company saysits ad revenue is “the strongest we’ve seen in a long, long time.”

“With these ratings, this schedule, and the ad market on fire, we are salivating,” CBS chief executive Les Moonves said as the company heads into the annual advertising sales hootenanny known as the Upfronts in the coming weeks.

The media business runs on ads. But since the birth of the web, the ad business has beenchanging. Analysts expect brands tospend $68.8 billion dollars this yearon digital advertising, according to eMarketer. Even so, TV has remained the single biggest recipient of marketers’ money. As more people abandon traditional TV for streaming services, YouTube, and social media, broadcasters will have to fight to keep advertisers coming back. But by then, the dichotomy between TV and digital may not mean much anyway.

Its definitely a complicated picture, says eMarketer’s senior analyst Paul Verna. But its not easy to say digital is killing TV.

Protecting the Business

In its own way, TV is still pretty unique. The internet dramatically changed thenewspaper, magazine, and radio industries. Many advertisers are no longer willing to pay top prices (or advertise at all) in those places as the audience shifted online.

Theres a lot more inertia in television than there was in the media that succumbed more quickly to disruption from the Internet, says Andrew Frank, a longtime analyst at Gartner who follows the marketing industry.

How have major broadcasters and cable networks held onto their dominant share of the public’s attention? Well, for one, people still watch a lot of TV on TV. Major sporting events, like the Super Bowl and the Olympics, draw millions of viewers. And yes, electoral politics still largely play out on television. TV still has massive scale, it has that cachet, Verna says. If its on TV, its important.” And advertisers want to bewhere they can reach the most people.

‘It’s not outlandish to think a billion dollars will come out of the linear television market and move to digital video.’

Even for thosewho dont watch TV in the old-fashioned way, many networks have developed their own websites, apps, and digital services. Advertisers consider ads on websites and apps digital spend. For networks, however, it’s all ad money coming their way.

Take Fox. Advertisers can buy slots during The Simpsons on its broadcast station or The Americans on basic cable. They can serveads during full episodes streaming on its website, streaming apps, and Hulu.(During last week’s earnings call, 21st Century Fox’s CEO James Murdoch called the going rate for ads for Fox’s shows on Hulu “very, very attractive.” Fox owns Hulu in a joint partnership with Disney-ABC and NBCUniversal.)

But when advertisers are spending money for ads attached to TV streaming on the internet, they don’t think of it as TV.

“Hulu, Roku, Apple TV. Is that television? No, its not. Its consumed on a big screen potentially in you living room, but we consider anything delivered by an IP device is not linear TV,” says David Cohen, the president of Magna Global in North America,a major ad-buyer that works with companies like Coca Cola and Johnson & Johnson.

In other words, networks are getting advertisers’ money both ways, which for the moment seems to have led to an overall bump. But Cohen predicts marketerswill begin to see more of the distinction blur.In theshort term, I think its not outlandish to think that a billion dollars will come out of the linear television market this year and move to digital video.

Time of Transition

And yet that doesnt mean that the future for broadcasters and cable networks isultimately secure. Analysts with eMarketer estimate that more money will be spent on digital advertising than TV by next year. Ad buyers and marketers are frustrated with the fact that TV ads continue to increase in cost even as ratings, for the most part, continue to fall. Why as marketers have we agreed to pay more for that decline in audience is exactly the question, Cohen says. Magna, for its part, said last week that it was moving $250 million from its TV budget to YouTube.

As the basic cable bundle comes apart and viewers get more options to pay for fewer channels in so-called “skinny bundles,” Frank believes that less popular channels may struggleas advertisers shift dollars to digital content people actually watch. But digital advertising is also complicated. Facebook and Google may dominate when it comes to competing in the digital space. But the ads still have to be shown to be effective, which is easier to demonstrate through “apples-to-apples” comparison. This is why YouTube, with its TV-like pre-roll ads, has thrived.

Over time, ad tech will get better at helping marketers understand who you are, where youre watching, and what you want, whether you’re on Facebook, YouTube, or just watching plain old TV. And that may help save traditional TV simply because advertisers will be able to show couch potatoes more ads for stuff they really do want. Television may be changing. But evolution is, if nothing else, a survival strategy.

Read more: http://www.wired.com/2016/05/nope-tv-business-isnt-dead-yet-far-really/

What if there was no advertising? | George Nimeh | TEDxVienna

Every month, over 200 million people are forcefully telling the world that they hate online advertising. Is anyone listening? And more importantly, is anyone doing anything about it?

More information on http://www.tedxvienna.at

George is a digital entrepreneur and an award-winning innovator in advertising and communications. He has worked with top brands, global agencies and startups for 20 years. And probably like you, he doesn’t like most advertising he sees online.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Video Rating: / 5

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