Marketing: An Introduction (12th Edition)

Marketing: An Introduction (12th Edition)

Marketing: An Introduction (12th Edition)

  • Used Book in Good Condition

Marketing: An Introduction is intended for use in undergraduate Principles of Marketing courses. It is also suitable for those interested in learning more about the fundamentals of marketing.   This best-selling, brief text introduces marketing through the lens of creating value for customers.   With engaging real-world examples and information, Marketing: An Introduction shows students how customer value–creating it and capturing it–drives every effective marketing strategy.

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